Vordingborgs Internationale
Egnsteater

What is human specific performance?

At the heart of our performances is the intimate meeting between performer and spectator in a universe of immersion, trust and presence.

Cantabile 2’s theatrical work, and the techniques we have developed continuously since 2003, provide fertile ground for extraordinary encounters between people.

The ambition of our methods is to enable performers and spectators to be receptive and responsive to each other in a common exchange of openness and vulnerability that arises during our performances.

We offer the audience personal and intense experiences in the authentic meetings. This is why we often only have room for a limited number of spectators per performance.
A particular quality of Cantabile 2’s humane specific performances is the basic principle of non-fiction, i.e. the elimination of the role understood as the production of a different character than the person the performer is in his personal life outside the theatre.
Our performances can be understood as a form of multi-level gaming, filled with transformative encounters and interactions that take participants to new levels.
Participants go into our human specific performances individually, in one group or in several smaller groups. Each participant makes individual choices and gives completely personal answers that shape the performance uniquely for each participant. The set design is usually simple and creates an aesthetic sensory universe that reinforces a sense of presence and being in the present.

Each participant is seen, touched and spoken to in a series of interactions with the performers, and often the participants are deeply affected. Nullo Facchini, head of Cantabile 2: “As long as you dare to enter into intimacy, you always discover that there is no better place to be in this world. Intimacy is where you feel connected, where you experience that we should never feel alone, where you are part of something larger, part of the world, part of the universe, part of humanity.”